Whitetail Deer Hunting Guides & Outfitters in Illinois, Kansas, Texas, Ohio, Kentucky, Missouri, and more

Whitetail Deer Hunts

Book a Whitetail Deer Hunting Trip with Professional, Pre-Screened Big Game Hunting Guides and Outfitters

Whitetail Deer Hunting

From the trophy bucks in South Texas, and the big-bodied, heavy-horned bucks in the heartland states of Kansas, Iowa, Illinois, and Ohio and up into Alberta and Saskatchewan, Canada, we've put together a great selection of Whitetail Deer hunts, 183 in total. Whitetail Deer hunts from reputable big game guides and outfitters for that trophy room filling hunting experience. Guided and self-guided bow and gun Whitetail Deer hunts.


Top 10 Whitetail Deer Hunts (Gun)

  Location  # of Outfitters  # of Hunts  Average Cost 
Kansas910$2,755
Ohio88$2,045
Alabama66$2,056
Texas66$3,521
Missouri66$2,667
Illinois66$2,513
Nebraska55$2,800
Iowa55$3,350
Saskatchewan55$4,220
Wisconsin44$8,225

To contact these professional Whitetail Deer guides and outfitters, select 1 to 3 locations above and then click

Visit our Find a Hunt page for all species/location hunt options


Top 10 Whitetail Deer Hunts (Bow)

  Location  # of Outfitters  # of Hunts  Average Cost 
Kansas910$2,690
Ohio88$1,948
Alabama66$1,867
Texas66$3,521
Missouri66$2,667
Illinois66$2,513
Nebraska55$2,550
Iowa55$3,350
Saskatchewan55$4,220
Kentucky44$2,438

To contact these professional Whitetail Deer guides and outfitters, select 1 to 3 locations above and then click

Visit our Find a Hunt page for all species/location hunt options


Whitetail Deer Guide (Alces alces)

The species is most common east of the Rocky Mountains, and is absent from much of the western United States, including Nevada, Utah, California, Hawaii, and Alaska (though its close relatives, the mule deer and black-tailed deer, can be found there). It does, however, survive in aspen parklands and deciduous river bottomlands within the central and northern Great Plains, and in mixed deciduous riparian corridors, river valley bottomlands, and lower foothills of the northern Rocky Mountain regions from Wyoming to southeastern British Columbia. The conversion of land adjacent to the northern Rockies into agriculture use and partial clear-cutting of coniferous trees (resulting in widespread deciduous vegetation) has been favorable to the whitetail deer and has pushed its distribution to as far north as Prince George, British Columbia. Populations of deer around the Great Lakes have also expanded their range northwards, due to conversion of land to agricultural uses favoring more deciduous vegetation, and local caribou and moose populations. The westernmost population of the species, known as the Columbian whitetail deer, once was widespread in the mixed forests along the Willamette and Cowlitz River valleys of western Oregon and southwestern Washington, but today its numbers have been considerably reduced, and it is classified as near-threatened.

Whitetail deer are generalists and can adapt to a wide variety of habitats. The largest deer occur in the temperate regions of Canada and United States. The smallest deer occur in the Florida Keys and much of Central America and in South America. Deer from Central and South America generally have smaller tails and antlers.

North American male deer (also known as a buck) usually weighs from 130 to 300 pounds but, in rare cases, bucks in excess of 375 pounds have been recorded. The record-sized Whitetail Deer weighed just over 500 pounds and was found in Minnesota. The female (doe) usually weighs from 90 to 200 pounds. Length ranges from 62 to 87 inches, including the tail, and the shoulder height is 32 to 40 inches.

Males re-grow their antlers every year. Antlers begin to grow in late spring, covered with a highly vascularised tissue known as velvet. Bucks either have a typical or non-typical antler arrangement. Typical antlers are symmetrical and the points grow straight up off the main beam. Non-typical antlers are asymmetrical and the points may project at any angle from the main beam. These descriptions are not the only limitations for typical and a typical antler arrangement. The Boone and Crockett or Pope & Young scoring systems also define relative degrees of typicality and atypicality by procedures to measure what proportion of the antlers are asymmetrical. Therefore, bucks with only slight asymmetry will often be scored as "typical". A buck's inside spread can be anywhere from 3?5 in. Bucks shed their antlers when all females have been bred, from late December to February.

Females enter estrus, also called the "rut", in the fall, normally in late October or early November, triggered mainly by declining photoperiod. Sexual maturation of females depends on population density. Females can mature in their first year, although this is unusual and would occur only at very low population levels. Most females mature at one or, sometimes, two years of age. Most are not able to reproduce until six months after they mature.

Males compete for the opportunity of breeding females. Sparring among males determines a dominance hierarchy. Bucks will attempt to copulate with as many females as possible, losing physical condition since they rarely eat or rest during the rut. The general geographical trend is for the rut to be shorter in duration at increased latitude. There are many factors as to how intense the "rutting season" will be. Air temperature is a major factor of how intense the action will be. Anytime the temperature rises above 40 degrees Fahrenheit, the males will do much less traveling looking for females, or they will be subject to overheating or dehydrating. Another factor for the strength in rutting activity is competition. If there are numerous males in a particular area, then they will compete more for the females. If there are fewer males or more females, then the selection process will not need to be as competitive.

Whitetails communicate in many different ways including sounds, scent, body language, and marking. All whitetail deer are capable of producing audible noises, unique to each animal. Fawns release a high pitched squeal, known as a bleat, to call out to their mothers. Does also bleat. Grunting produces a low, guttural sound that will attract the attention of any other deer in the area. Both does and bucks snort, a sound that often signals danger. As well as snorting, bucks also grunt at a pitch that gets lower with maturity. Bucks are unique, however, in their grunt-snort-wheeze pattern that often shows aggression and hostility. Another way whitetail deer communicate is with their white tail. When a white-tail deer is spooked it will raise its tail to warn the other deer in the area that can see them.

In western regions of the United States and Canada, the whitetail deer range overlaps with those of the black-tailed deer and mule deer. White-tail incursions in the Trans-Pecos region of Texas has resulted in some hybrids. In the extreme north of the range, their habitat is also used by moose in some areas. Whitetail deer may occur in areas that are also exploited by elk such as in mixed deciduous river valley bottomlands and formerly in the mixed deciduous forest of Eastern United States.

As most hunters know, they are smart and elusive and big bucks can be difficult to hunt. Whitetails are favored among sportsmen because they are abundant, accessible and a challenge to hunt. North, south, east and west, hunters of all ages pursue this magnificent animal each fall.

If you've been wanting to go Whitetail Deer hunting in South Texas, the Mid-West, Canada, or anyplace else that offers great deer hunting, you're affordable adventure can start here at OutfitterPros.com


Spotlight Whitetail Deer Outfitter

BC Guide Outfitters

BC Guide Outfitters operates its Moose and Bear hunts within a 900 square mile plateau of prime Moose and Bear habitat. We have over 200 lakes and 3 major rivers.

We have a diversity of remote wilderness and replanted cut blocks. This has created some of the best Moose and Bear habitat in the world! It provides feed in the logged area, but still enough cover to create a safe haven for wildlife.

At the recent Moose workshop with BC's Fish and Wildlife dept. It was pointed out that our game managment zone had one of the highest Moose populations in BC!

This is what led to the best fall Moose season in 20 years this past year!

We have a great Base camp with cabins for our hunters on our lake front property. Some hunts are conducted from our base camp and some from our remote camps on remote lakes and rivers. In addition to our Moose and Bear hunts, we also offer premium wilderness hunts throughout our family of guide territories for Elk, Whitetail Deer, Mule Deer, Mountain Goat, Grizzly Bear, Cougar, Lynx and Wolf.

We pride ourselves on a reputation for friendly hardworking guides, awesome home cooked meals and well stocked camps. We have a very high return of hunters year after year. We are told that we make our clients feel at home and are treated like family. References are available upon request.

One of the secrets of our success has been that we are full time Outfitters. This is what we do. We spend from April to November in our camps and our territory, cutting trails, hauling in boats to remote lakes and building camps in the backcountry. We are also on the landscape scouting all season long. That is the difference between a full time operator and those that show up the week before the hunt and throw it all together.

Give us a call, we would love to chat!

Species Offered


Bear - Black
Bear - Brown/Grizzly
Caribou
Deer - Mule
Deer - Whitetail
Elk
Lynx
Moose
Mountain Goat
Mountain Lion
Wolf

For ALL Big Game, Waterfowl, Upland Bird, Varmint, and Small Game Hunts, visit Find A Hunt

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